Antique Chinese Ancient

Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation

Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation
Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation

Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation

Artifacts, Antiques & Fine Collect i bles. Ancient Neolithic Chinese Jade Axe. Immortality Heaven (Ti'en) Tablet. English Translation of Chinese Characters! A ritual offering of wine is offered to the Council of Ancestors, who have all been called by Heavenly Decree to the Great Hall in Heaven (Tien).

Because of this Souls perfect work on Earth, may he easily be granted entrance into Heaven by the Council of Ancestors. A gentleman always carried a jade pendant, as a symbol of class and to remind him the virtues of a gentleman, since those virtues were found in jade. This RARE and very beautiful ancient, Neolithic Chinese Heaven/Axe (called a Jue in Chinese) is made of pure, Nephrite Jade that weighs about 2.13 lbs. It has turned a wonderful shade of dark brown with highlights of burnt orange from the iron in the damp soil for over 4,000 years! This ceremonial Nephrite Jade Axe weighs about 2.13 lbs.

And is about 7.25" (184 mm) tall x 6.0" (153 mm) wide x. It has a wonderful, original patina with no major chips, cracks, repairs, or restorations. Only surface scratches, calcification and differential weathering & pitting. There are 4, Extremely RARE ancient Chinese characters in low relief on one side of this jade tablet, that I have translated into English.

While the other side has 3 large graphic symbols that represent the Three Huang Emperors of Heaven, Earth, and Man. This ancient jade tablet is shaped like an axe, with a single small hole in the top-center that would have served as a suspension hole. The shape of the ritual axe is thought to scare away Evil Spirits, who were thought to lurk everywhere and who could prevent the soul of man from reaching immortality in Heaven.

The three, horizontal lines on the top represents the Chinese character (San): which means Heaven, Earth, and Mankind. On both sides of the amulet are several ancient Chinese pictographs (characters) carved into the stone in low relief that I have translated below into English. These characters are carved in the earliest Chinese script called Kuwen or Large Seal Script.

In ancient China, this jade axe was thought to be able to carry safely the spirit of the deceased to Heaven (Tien in Chinese) and immortality. Jade was thought to represent Heaven and was considered more precious than gold in ancient China. Chinese experts estimate that it was made during the late Hongshan Culture (4500 BC--2250 BC) of ancient China about 4,000 years-ago! I Guarantee it to be authentic and original! This stunning jade amulet is made of solid Nephrite jade.

Although heavily pitted, it has a wonderful ancient patina from the iron that has been absorbed into the once green jade after being buried in damp soil for over 4,000 years. This iron in the soil has turned this jade amulet a wonderful color saddle-brown with burnt-orange accents! It is a very early example and is one of the few examples that has several ancient Chinese characters (pictographs) in low relief carved into both sides of the ritual axe/tablet. This amulet has a small, suspension hole at the very top of the amulet that is classified as "double-bevel hole" by anthropologists.

It would have been used to suspend the amulet around the neck of its owner. The top suspension hole is called a "double-bevel hole" that was drilled by hand, from each side with a slow-speed drill.

The hole is period correct and shows the growth of tiny micro-crystals of jade inside the bore holes and on the surface of the axe. This chemical reaction can only happen after a piece of carved jade has been buried for thousands of years in damp soil. These tiny crystals almost look like white powder and should never be cleaned off or removed as they attest to the authenticity of the piece.

REF: " JADE " by Roger Keverne, pg. In ancient China, this ritual axe would have been placed in the tomb or temple of the departed by his family to protect him or her from evil spirits on his journey to the afterlife and to allow him/her to enter Heaven. It would also show the ancestors and spirits that he was a wealthy and honorable person whose perfect work would allow him immortality in Heaven. This lovely amulet contains several ancient, Chinese pictographic characters that have been carved in low relief and incorporated into the design of this amulet.

I have been able to read and translate the larger characters, but their are dozens of smaller ones have been obscured by the extensive pitting and weathering this jade amulet suffered when it was buried in the damp earth over 4,000-years-ago. This ancient, jade, Chinese tablet is in the shape of a ritual axe. It would have been placed in a temple built above a royal tomb to symbolize a persons social stratum, military rank, status, and identity. The three symbols on the front of the ritual jade axe (jue) are believed to honor the Three Huang emperors of Heaven, Earth, and Man. The ancient Chinese considered jade the most precious of all materials, prizing it more than gold, silver or bronze.

Sophisticated jade and lapidary production techniques had already been mastered by the Neolithic era, and the love of jade, which some anthropologists consider a defining characteristic of Chinese culture, has endured until the present day. Earliest jades came in the form of ritual implements (such as bi discs and cong tubes), articles of personal adornment, small carvings, and various types of blades. The latter were used as weapons in Neolithic times because jade is a very hard stone, but likely served more as badges of office and emblems of rank. Zhou Rites, a book that records the sacrificial activities of the Shang and Zhou dynasties, says, Jade is used to make six ritual objects (bi, cong, gui, zhang, huang, and hu) to be offered to Heaven, Earth, and the four directionsNorth, South, East & West.

The offering of sacrifice to heaven, to the gods, and to ancestors were all important rituals for emperors. But the Sacrifice to Heaven is believed to have been the most important one. This ceremony was performed by the emperor on the winter solstice every year.

The characters used on this jade axe suggest that this offering was perhaps used in the Sacrifice to Heaven ceremony. The deaths of ruling kings and emperors were grand is scale with hundreds or even thousands of precious jade and latter bronze artwork entombed in their imperial resting places.

Above the tombs, mausoleums became the sites for sacrifices to be offered to them and to the ancestors and gods during each of the four seasons. The front side of this ceremonial jade axe contains three graphic symbols that have been carved in low relief in the jade. Starting with the figure on the top, here is my translation of the meanings of these three symbols. This symbol on the top that looks like a cross {see photo # 2} is the ancient Chinese graphic for the temple of the deceased ancestor. Temples or memorials were built on the surface, directly above the tombs of deceased members of the Chinese aristocracy.

All the descendants, sons and grandsons, would stand in front of this entrance and present their offerings to their departed ancestors. These offerings would often be presented on the monthly and then yearly passing of the ancestor.

The circular symbol on the bottom left {see photo # 3} is a Bi that symbolizes the cosmos with the portal to Heaven (Tien) in the center. The bi disc is one of the six ritual jades: bi (representing the heavens), cong (tubes, representing the earth), gui (ceremonial flat blades and axes, representing the east), zhang (ceremonial flat blades and axes, representing the south), hu (a vessel, representing the west), and huang (a flat arc of jade, representing the north). Of these ritual jades, the bi is perhaps the most important and one of the most enduring forms found in Chinese art. And the final symbol on the right see photo # 4 is a Huang with two suspension holes in it. Huang means resplendent, beautiful, and grand.

In ancient China, the concept of the Three Huang and Five Di was well established. The Three Huang were the emperors of Heaven, Earth, and Man. While the Five Di were mythical emperors known as: Huangdi, Zhuanxu, Diku, Yao, and Shun. Originally signified God in Heaven or the Highest Power and he was the dominant god ruling over the cosmos.

There are four, compound, ideographs (graphic characters) abraded in low relief on the other side (reverse side) of this jade axe. The pictographic characters are the first written characters ever used by the Neolithic Chinese.

I offer my best translation of these four graphic characters. A ritual offering of wine is offered to the meeting of the Ancestors, who have all been called by Heavenly Decree to the Great Hall in Heaven (Tien).

The three horizontal lines at the top of the axe symbolize the number of Heaven, Earth, and Humanity (in Chinese San). The Emperor is the one who connects these three elements of the cosmos together. A ritual offering of mans perfect wine of offered as a ritual sacrifice.

It is poured and falls on a bundle of grass, which was then burned after the ceremony was over. Lower Right {photo # 7}. In philosophical terms, a reunion or meeting (Chien) of several ancestors in a great hall. An Honorable (Sweet) Heavenly Decrees (Ling) that has called several men to life and determines their fate.

Edicts issued by an emperor were entitled Sacred Instructions or jade words from the golden mouth. No one was allowed to say the emperors nameit was even forbidden to write it. 47, 79, 185, 191, 76the edicts of Emperors who are supposed to speak in soft or sweet words. Top Left {see photo 8}. The Spirit of the deceased mans (Fu) pledge to do perfect work.

Lower Left {see photo # 9}. A rare compound graphic that depicts the birth of a new-born child, head forward, thus in the most favorable position, as he/she is born from the mother's womb. Hence, its extended meaning is that one something that happens fluently, naturally, or easy, as that motion of falling water (Liu). The natural birth of the child entering one world from another was thought to be like a persons soul departing Earth for Heaven (Tien). In addition to the four large characters, there are dozens of much smaller characters (some as small as 2 mm) that were carved into both the front and back of this amazing yue-axe! There are characters for: ancestor, son, speaking, ritual offering, etc. The differential weathering and pitting make it difficult to read and thus translate all the tiny characters, but if you look carefully you can see them without magnification.

Therefore, my literal translation of this precious, jade amulet is as follows. Because of this Souls perfect work on Earth, may he easily be granted entrance into Heaven by the council of Ancestors. Jade was highly prized by these early civilizations in China and it was thought to have positive energy to drive away evil spirits and bring good luck and fortune to all who wore a piece on their person--in life and in death.

Jade was also believed to be a portal or messenger that could carry prayers to Heaven and send messages to those on Earth from departed ancestors and Gods in Heaven. This ancient amulet is a fine work of art and it is truly a museum quality study piece of great historical significance. Because of its cultural significance, it is highly recommended that this item be for display only. As noted above, although this jade pendant is heavily pitted and shows signs of differential weathering, it has a wonderful ancient patina. It has not been repaired or restored and is in as found condition.

The jade pendant has one hole that would have been used for suspension around the neck. The hole was been drilled by ancient hand tools at low RPM from both sides of the amulet--see 4x macro photos. These are period correct and have a wonderful layer of calcium and micro-crystalline jade inside the bore holes--just perfect.

I have examined this piece under 10x and 80x magnification and it shows no signs of modern tool marks--only hand tools were used to make this amulet. It has been cut, carved, shaped, and drilled with ancient hand tools. I also examined it under Black Light and found no signs of repairs or modern carving. Modern drills would have drilled the hole straight and true--and not larger on the outer edge of the hole.

Thus, this ancient, drilled hole is another sign that this amulet is original and authentic. The hand tool marks left in the jade by the master stone artist who carved, shaped, and engraved this work of art appear to be consistent with those marks of other ancient jades I have examined. Each object I sell is professionally researched, translated if I can... (smile), and compared with similar objects in the collections of the finest museums in the world. When in doubt, I have worked with dozens of subject matter experts to determine the condition and authenticity of numerous antiquities and antiques.

He shows in great detail how the experts determine the age and date of ancient Chinese Jade. Please examine the photos taken at 4x macro carefully as they are part of the description.

Museum of Chinese History, Beijing. The Great Bronze Age of China. Edited by Wen Fong, MET, 1980. Changhua Annals of the Republic of China. Smithsonian Museum, Sackler & Freer Gallery, WDC.

The item "Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation" is in sale since Monday, April 15, 2019. This item is in the category "Antiques\Asian Antiques\China\Amulets". The seller is "houghton-usa" and is located in Sequim, Washington.

This item can be shipped to United States.

  • Type: Tablet (Jue) Axe
  • Region of Origin: China
  • Age: c.

    2,500 BC

  • Primary Material: Jade
  • Maker: Unknown
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Color: Brown w/Orange Highlights


Ancient Chinese 3 Emperor's Jade Axe Jue Immortality & Heaven withTranslation