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Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation

Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation
Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation

Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation

Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation , circa 1300 - 1350 CE.

Our paintings and sculpture range from the 17th C. Inspection of our merchandise is available by appointment in our Roger's Park (Chicago) gallery.

FREE PICK-UP IN THE CHICAGOLAND AREA. Up for your consideration is a very rare, 14th Century Chinese martaban vase, very large, with an incised dragon design. Ovoid brown vase, circa 1300 - 1350 AD, decorated with three claw dragons and adorned with side handles, from the 1968 Locsin Excavation at Laguna in southern Luzon Philippines, 12 1/2" ht by 14" wide.

Condition: chip to the rim and cracks on three handles. The vase has cracks to 3 of the 6 handles (which were used for feeding rope). The cracks are clean, and the pieces glued back in place. Also, there is a large chip to the side of the rim.

The brown drip glaze shows flaking in several areas as shown. The piece presents very well.

Among the many kinds of Chinese ceramics that were exported is a variety of unrefined, stoneware storage jars. These ovoid jars are sometimes called "Martaban" wares after the transit port of Marta ban in Burma, a common stop in the trade route traveled by the ships carrying this pottery. These robust jars have bold, incised or relief decoration under different kinds of glazes, principally olive green, golden brown, brown, or almost black.

Loop handles or pierced masks, through which a rope could be passed to secure a cover, are generally placed around the shoulder. "Martaban" jars can be quite large, sometimes reaching up to three feet in height. This enigmatic group cannot be given a single place of origin. In general, it is agreed that these jars came from various kilns in southern China, and one source has been located at Qishicun, near Foshan, in Guangdong Province. It is most difficult to date them: some authorities believe that "Martaban" wares originated as early as the Tang dynasty; other experts think that they started to be made during the Song period. At least two of the fragments that were found at the Qishicun kilns carried the reign marks of Northern Song-dynasty emperors. Martaban jars have been mentioned by travelers as early as the fourteenth century.

Many of them can probably be dated to the Ming era-they were found in the load of the Witte Leeuw. Natives of the Philippines have treasured these wares; and in Borneo, the Dyaks and other peoples have sometimes given jars names and even credited them with powers of speech and movement. In the municipality of Pila, Laguna. The 2010 census estimates its population at 5,305 people.

In the area have contributed to developments in the field of ceramics. And led to the recognition of the importance of the area to archaeology. Archaeological excavations in the area have contributed to the developments in the field of ceramics and led to the recognition of the importance of the Laguna de Bay area to archaeology. Otley Beyer had pointed out the archaeological potential of the areas around Laguna de Bay due to its strategic location. It was among the most important centers of trade and culture during the period in the history of the Philippines that Beyer called the Porcelain Age, during which trade with China.

Under the Sung and Yuan dynastiesflourished, as evidenced by trade ceramics dated from the same period. Despite the number of porcelain sites in the area, only a few had been systematically excavated until the 1960s. In 1967, archaeological excavations were conducted by Julita Fernandez, Amelia Rogel, Dr. Robert Bradford Fox and Avelino Legaspi around the Laguna de Bay area.

153 graves were found, dated from 12th to 15th CE. Leandro and Cecilia Locsin and a team of archaeologists from the University of San Carlos. Tenazas, partially excavated three sites in Pinagbayanan from 1967 to 1968.

Helped in recovering additional information by uncovering burial locations. The dearth of skeletal remains made the identification of burials difficult. Of the 190 burials discovered, only 20 contained traces of skeletal remains. With the exception of one Ming burial which was the most well-preserved and contained ten pieces of pottery, none of the other burials were associated with grave goods. The discoveries in the Locsin and the University of San Carlos. Excavation of Pinagbayanan are divided into several archaeological horizons dated from 1100 AD to 1400 AD. The first horizon is associated with the Iron Age, before trade contacts were established with China or Arabia and contained earthenware used for burials. The second horizon is associated with the Sung period. The depth of the stratigraphic layer indicates long periods without cultural change.

The site was mainly used for burials. The third horizon is associated with the Yuan period. The presence of horse bones shows that horses had come earlier than the Spaniards. The sites were used for habitation and burials. A crematory complex was also discovered.

The stone structure contained phosphate deposits, bamboo charcoal and other evidence of burning. Phallic earthenwares were found in the Pinagbayanan sites which suggest the possibility that they were used as a symbol of fertility. A net sinker that might have been intended to be a yonic symbol was also discovered. This quote is for the Continental U.

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Get FREE counters from Vendio today! The item "Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation" is in sale since Thursday, December 5, 2019.

This item is in the category "Antiques\Asian Antiques\China\Vases". The seller is "thesapphiregallery" and is located in Chicago, Illinois. This item can be shipped worldwide.

  • Region of Origin: China
  • Age: Pre-1800
  • Primary Material: Porcelain & Pottery
  • Original/Reproduction: Antique Original


Fine 14 ANCIENT 14th C. CHINESE MARTABAN Pottery Vase Phillipines Excavation